Gratitude

Gratitude. (noun)

The proposed 11th principle.
Gratitude is not about running around saying thank you all the time, but rather, it is the belief that it is important to remind ourselves where we come from, and to appreciate what has been given to us to get us to where we are. We are not entitled to anything, and approach our relations to others from a place of gratitude for their efforts.
It takes everyone to make a burner event, from skills of the builders to the amazed energy and excitement of the newbies; talented artists to the pretty pretty ponies. Thank you for coming out and making it awesome.

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By Shenanigans

Playa Foot

Playa Foot, – noun

A painful cracking rash caused by prolonged contact with the alkali lakebed. Basically, a chemical burn. While this malady is not serious, it is uncomfortable. The good news is that it’s easily cared for. Some folks use vinegar and water foot soaks, others swear by Doctor Bronner’s Soap.

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By Shenanigans


RESOURCES

Gifting

Gifting. verb

Burning Man is devoted to acts of gift giving. The value of a gift is unconditional. Gifting does not contemplate a return or an exchange for something of equal value.
For many people who are active in the burner community year round, the giving never stops.

From artists to event producers to DJ’s, they gift their time and skills so we can have events that are fun and amazing. For people who love what they do and do what they love, the gift is it’s own reward.

Many others bring gifts to events, from homemade items to gifts of food and drink. They are not exchanged, but given unconditionally, and often cherished unconditionally. When, after building a man, burning it and dancing your ass off around it, you find Guerill’d Cheese at 2 am, you cherish that sandwich.

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By Shenanigans


GIFTING, The Burner Principles were created relatively recently as an attempt to share the core values of the Burn community as it grew beyond That Thing in the Desert to encompass an increasing number of regional events. Like the principles themselves, the concept of a gift economy is a relative newcomer to Black Rock City. Though conventional commerce has been strictly limited since the old days, there was one time when barter was commonplace. This practice has since fallen out of favor, in part due to encouragement from the BMORG who were facing the possibility that thedefault world would impose itself on the playa through sales tax and other legal entanglements.

Virgins often expend much effort worrying about what gifts they will offer the community. Although swag is welcomed, especially items imprinted with the Burning Man logo, the best gifts are those which arise organically in the moment when one participant perceives a need they can satisfy. Gifts are not always lasting objects — food, drink, and physical labor are just as common. When Burners help build aneffigy or erect a shade structure they are giving a gift; so is anyone giving rides on their mutant vehicle or doing a Ranger or Greeter shift. The gift economy is the reason the playa provides, serendipitously helping Burners find what they need when they need it.

This principle extends to a spirit of generosity found throughout the lives of Burners, reminding them to share what they have and to ask when they are lacking. Despite a limited number of paid employees, Burning Man would not exist without its volunteers and most regionals remain entirely based on volunteer labor. Though most will go far to help those in need, Burners who have accumulated the most whuffie tend to receive the most assistance in reality camp.

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From Kit O’Connell’s amazing Burner Lexicon! http://kitoconnell.com/writing/lexicon


RELATED RESOURCES:

 

Decommodification

Word Of the day: Special, just for those of you following the Krugg thing.

Decommodification.
In order to preserve the spirit of gifting, our community seeks to create social environments that are unmediated by commercial sponsorships, transactions, or advertising. We stand ready to protect our culture from such exploitation. We resist the substitution of consumption for participatory experience.

Remember, this isn’t a music festival, you can’t buy a tee shirt, and we don’t have a sponsor, no one is making any money, only gifting their time and energy. Logos are out, product placement should be in your belly, not in front of a camera, and selling at the event is one of the easy ways to get asked to leave.

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By Shenanigans



DECOMMODIFICATION,
 Our lives can feel fully commercialized — advertising surrounds us, from logos on the clothing we wear to advertisements so pervasive they even appear in bathroom stalls. Not only do people take part in a commercialized world, they sometimes even craft their identity from their shopping choices (Android vs. iPhone, anyone?). People are even encouraged to market their “personal brand.”

Subcultures and counterculture are especially susceptible to being co-opted and commercialized as marketers andcoolhunters look for the latest youth trends to capitalize on in a process that has gone on since well before the 1960′s — according to the book Counterculture Through the Ages by R. U. Sirius and Dan Joy, the automotive industry borrowed the term “tripping out” for use in ad copy as early as 1967. Though commercialization does not necessarily destroy subcultures, it can interfere with participants’ ability to experience them with complete immediacy.

Thus far, the Burning Man community has largely resisted commercialization through a dedication to the principle of decommodification, a dedication that it acts on through both social and legal means. Socially, Burners work to hide logos on rented trucks and enforce the commerce free, gift economy nature of their event through education and peer pressure. Legally, theBMORG (and similar regional organizers) enforce decommodification by carefully policing the use of logo, name, and even photos from the events. This has included successful lawsuits against groups like Girls Gone Wild, who would have exploited female participants for profit. Ideally, Burners use this increased awareness to make more knowing choices when they return to the commercially saturated default world.

In 2007 the BMORG made the controversial decision to allow certain environmental organizations to display their products in a special pavilion near the effigy as part of that year’s Green Man theme. It was that same year that Paul Addis made an even more controversial attempt to burn the effigy early, at least partly in protest to the weight given to this corporate logo, an act for which he was charged with felony arson.

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From Kit O’Connell’s amazing Burner Lexicon! http://kitoconnell.com/writing/lexicon

Radical Inclusion

Radical Inclusion

This can be expressed in many ways.
Officially it is: Anyone may be a part of Burning Man. We welcome and respect the stranger. No prerequisites exist for participation in our community.
Essentially it’s the idea that everyone is equally welcome at Burn events, no matter how weird.
It doesn’t mean you have to invite everyone or anyone, or that absolutely any behaviour is acceptable. But unless your behaviour is more criminal or outrageously antisocial than most you are welcome.
I express it as Welcome home. All of you, old friends and new, welcome home.

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By Shenanigans


RADICAL INCLUSION, –NOUN, Radical Inclusion is the idea that everyone is welcome at That Thing In the Desert and other events which follow the Ten Principles of Burning Man. Though many have commented on the predominantly Caucasian make-up of the Black Rock City population, citizenship is open to all.

This is not limited to just the usual race, creed, color or sexual orientation. Many find a home at Burn events who feel themselves outcasts in the default worldfor countless reasons. Even more so, participants feel free to remove the masks they wear in polite society and share their freakiest, most delightfully deviant selves.

But what are the limits of radical inclusion? Some extreme behaviors, like theft and assault, must be held unacceptable in any healthy community. And just because an event is attended by Burners does not mean it will allow everyone — this is especially true of parties in private homes. This is not discrimination, but the natural formation of social groups and friend circles.  However, this principle still serves to discourage cliquish behavior and encourage the introduction of new blood to older groups.

Like all of the Burner Principles, radical inclusion functions poorly in isolation and works best when used in conjunction with the other nine and a healthy dose of common sense.

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From Kit O’Connell’s amazing Burner Lexicon! http://kitoconnell.com/writing/lexicon

Community

Community –noun

A group sharing common characteristics or interests and perceived or perceiving itself as distinct in some respect from the larger society within which it exists.

The burnerverse is like an onion, there are layers of community all the way down.
The world wide burner community consists of a huge number of people with diverse interests and values. People who identify as Neo-Cons, & Hippies, spiritualists, atheists, or deeply religious, the very wealthy, and some folks who have rejected money all together, all brought together by that thing in the desert.
Local burner communities bring people together year round, working together on events and projects, sharing food and drink, resources and experiences. Some will never make it to the playa, but are still essential burners, integral to their community.

Theme camps are often our home when we go home, and the community bonds we build there can be the strongest. The shared experience of building something together, making it work or seeing it fail, then dusting off the pieces and building it again binds people together in all sorts of ways.

In an environment of openness and freedom community forms organically. The creative juices flow, people with similar tastes, interests and values start building off of each other, and when the inspiration strikes, collaboration and community manifests.

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By Shenanigans